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Many Thoughts, Head Empty #2: Mini-Reviews of ARCs I Read During Latinx Heritage Month – Blogmas ’20 Day 7

Hey there, friends!

Yes, I fell behind again, folks but this time, we have my deadly allergies to blame. I always say winter is my favorite season (which it is!), but the allergies are my least favorite thing, lol.

We also have GOT7 to blame for that, since they completely stole my heart and have completely rendered me useless!

But that’s not the point, the point is that for yesterday’s belated post, I am bringing you something I’ve been meaning to post for two months, rip. But since I took that unexpected blogging *and* reviewing slump, I never got around to finish working on it. But I finally did it, I mustered the motivation!

For today, I am bringing back a little series I created back in March called No Thoughts, Head Empty, where I write mini-reviews/blurbs for books I just don’t have enough words to describe! Maybe they were *too* incredible or I simply don’t have enough thoughts to write a full-length review.

(Check out No Thoughts, Head Empty #1 here!)

In this second installment, I’ll be reviewing three ARCs I read during Latinx Heritage Month: Land of the Cranes by Aida Salazar, Miss Meteor by Tehlor Kay Mejia & Anna-Marie McLemore, and Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia!

These are all such fantastic books I wish I’d talked about more on my blog, but fear not, I’m here to rectify that! Let’s begin!

Land of the Cranes by Aida Salazar

In her latest middle grade novel, Aida Salazar once again captivates readers with her stunning writing in verse and compelling characters in this heartbreaking but hopeful story about immigration and what it means to be undocumented in America. Through 10-year old Betita’s innocent lens, we are exposed to the realities experienced by immigrants in detention camps in the United States and the inhumane conditions they face. Land of the Cranes is not an easy read; it will break your heart into a million little pieces and restore it all over again in a tale full of stunning picture poems that navigates the importance of family, community, and love, and the value of using art to express yourself in revolutionary ways.

For fans of: novels in verse, middle grade, beautiful imagery, themes of family and unity, and crying really hard!

Goodreads / Amazon / Indiebound / Bookshop

Thank you to Scholastic for providing me an eARC of this book in exchange of an honest review! *This in no way influenced my opinion.*


Miss Meteor by Tehlor Kay Mejia and Anna- Marie McLemore

Anna-Marie McLemore and Tehlor Kay Mejia’s first YA collaboration is the stuff of Latinx readers’ dreams, and yes, I am glad to reportI am one of those readers. Miss Meteor takes so many popular tropes from teenage coming-of-age media, like revenge plots, friends-to-lovers romance, diners, pageant competitions, high school outcasts, estranged friends, popular boy being friends with the misfit, and small towns and turns it in its head into something out of this world. Something beautiful and stunning, just like stardust. Not only does this collaboration shine with its vibrant characters and setting, but it masterfully tackles themes of racism, xenophobia, transphobia, and body positivity. Miss Meteor is truly a classic for the ages, and I hope it crashes right into everyone’s TBRs. 

For fans of: trans and pansexual rep, teenage coming-of-age movies, soft friendships, small towns, Selena Quintanilla, magical realism, coziness, platonic and romantic love, and sisterhood!

Goodreads / Amazon / Indiebound / Bookshop

Thank you to HarperTeen and HarperCollins Children’s Books for providing me an e-ARC of this book in exchange of an honest review! *This in no way influenced my opinion.*


Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-García

Silvia Moreno-García has an unexplainable way with words. The way that she weaves them is absolutely ethereal, and I’m so glad this adult fantasy set in 1920s Mexico was my first time experiencing her talent. The storytelling in this novel is wonderful; not only do you get transported to the Jazz Era and get an inside look at the beautiful architecture of this age, but you feel every single one of the character’s emotions, their fears, joys, and regrets. This especially comes through via Casiopea and Hun-Kamé’s relationship, which is full of yearning and gentleness. Reading this book was like hearing the melody of a harp when you enter the gates of heaven, which proves Moreno-García is a masterful storyteller, capable of enchanting any reader.

For fans of: Mayan mythology, the Jazz Age, yearning, immortal gods trying to figure out how to do mundane things, lingering looks, road trips, and the stars!

Goodreads / Amazon / Indiebound / Bookshop

Thank you to Del Rey Books for providing me an eARC of this book in exchange of an honest review! *This in no way influenced my opinion.*


And that concludes this Blogmas post!

I’m still dusting off my reviewing skills, so crossing my fingers this was of your liking, teehee.

Have you read any of these books? If so, did you feel the same way I did about them?

Now that we’re in the thick of the holiday season, all of these novels would make great gifts, either to a loved one or yourself, so consider spreading some joy!

I hope you all enjoyed, and I’ll see you soon with the next one!

Love,

Caro 🎄

One reply on “Many Thoughts, Head Empty #2: Mini-Reviews of ARCs I Read During Latinx Heritage Month – Blogmas ’20 Day 7”

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